GenomeRNAi - a database for RNAi phenotypes and reagents

Phenotype information for gene 613 (BCR)

Screen TitleGene IDGene SymbolReagent IDScorePhenotypeFollow Up
Ciliogenesis and cilium length (1)
613
BCR
1237
-8.15
none no

Reference

Functional genomic screen for modulators of ciliogenesis and cilium length. Kim et al., 2010

Primary cilia are evolutionarily conserved cellular organelles that organize diverse signalling pathways. Defects in the formation or function of primary cilia are associated with a spectrum of human diseases and developmental abnormalities. Genetic screens in model organisms have discovered core machineries of cilium assembly and maintenance. However, regulatory molecules that coordinate the biogenesis of primary cilia with other cellular processes, including cytoskeletal organization, vesicle trafficking and cell-cell adhesion, remain to be identified. Here we report the results of a functional genomic screen using RNA interference (RNAi) to identify human genes involved in ciliogenesis control. The screen identified 36 positive and 13 negative ciliogenesis modulators, which include molecules involved in actin dynamics and vesicle trafficking. Further investigation demonstrated that blocking actin assembly facilitates ciliogenesis by stabilizing the pericentrosomal preciliary compartment (PPC), a previously uncharacterized compact vesiculotubular structure storing transmembrane proteins destined for cilia during the early phase of ciliogenesis. The PPC was labelled by recycling endosome markers. Moreover, knockdown of modulators that are involved in the endocytic recycling pathway affected the formation of the PPC as well as ciliogenesis. Our results uncover a critical regulatory step that couples actin dynamics and endocytic recycling with ciliogenesis, and also provides potential target molecules for future study.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00149-A-1
Screen Title: Ciliogenesis and cilium length (1)
Assay: Smoothed protein expression
Method: Fluorescence
Scope: Druggable genes
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: htRPE
Library: Ambion, Human druggable genome siRNA library V3.1
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Normalized percent inhibition
Cutoff: > 1.5 OR < -1.5 standard deviations from mean
Notes:

Self-renewal and pluripotency in human embryonic stem cells (1)
NM_207474
FLJ42953
-1.13
none no

Reference

A genome-wide RNAi screen reveals determinants of human embryonic stem cell identity. Chia et al., 2010

The derivation of human ES cells (hESCs) from human blastocysts represents one of the milestones in stem cell biology. The full potential of hESCs in research and clinical applications requires a detailed understanding of the genetic network that governs the unique properties of hESCs. Here, we report a genome-wide RNA interference screen to identify genes which regulate self-renewal and pluripotency properties in hESCs. Interestingly, functionally distinct complexes involved in transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodelling are among the factors identified in the screen. To understand the roles of these potential regulators of hESCs, we studied transcription factor PRDM14 to gain new insights into its functional roles in the regulation of pluripotency. We showed that PRDM14 regulates directly the expression of key pluripotency gene POU5F1 through its proximal enhancer. Genome-wide location profiling experiments revealed that PRDM14 colocalized extensively with other key transcription factors such as OCT4, NANOG and SOX2, indicating that PRDM14 is integrated into the core transcriptional regulatory network. More importantly, in a gain-of-function assay, we showed that PRDM14 is able to enhance the efficiency of reprogramming of human fibroblasts in conjunction with OCT4, SOX2 and KLF4. Altogether, our study uncovers a wealth of novel hESC regulators wherein PRDM14 exemplifies a key transcription factor required for the maintenance of hESC identity and the reacquisition of pluripotency in human somatic cells.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00184-A-1
Screen Title: Self-renewal and pluripotency in human embryonic stem cells (1)
Assay: POU5F1 protein expression
Method: Fluorescence
Scope: Genome-wide
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: hESC H1
Library: Dharmacon, SMARTpool siRNA library
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Z-score
Cutoff: < -2
Notes:

Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (1)
BCR
-0.87
none yes

Reference

CK1epsilon is required for breast cancers dependent on beta-catenin activity. Kim et al., 2010

Aberrant beta-catenin signaling plays a key role in several cancer types, notably colon, liver and breast cancer. However approaches to modulate beta-catenin activity for therapeutic purposes have proven elusive to date.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00221-A-1
Screen Title: Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (1)
Assay: Viability
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: MCF7
Library: The RNAi Consortium (TRC), TRC shRNA Library
Reagent Type: shRNA
Score Type: B-score
Cutoff: < -1
Notes: Essential gene: gene with B-score < -1 for >= 2 shRNAs

Melanogenesis
NM_004327
BCR
np
0.97
none no

Reference

Genome-wide siRNA-based functional genomics of pigmentation identifies novel genes and pathways that impact melanogenesis in human cells. Ganesan et al., 2008

Melanin protects the skin and eyes from the harmful effects of UV irradiation, protects neural cells from toxic insults, and is required for sound conduction in the inner ear. Aberrant regulation of melanogenesis underlies skin disorders (melasma and vitiligo), neurologic disorders (Parkinson''s disease), auditory disorders (Waardenburg''s syndrome), and opthalmologic disorders (age related macular degeneration). Much of the core synthetic machinery driving melanin production has been identified; however, the spectrum of gene products participating in melanogenesis in different physiological niches is poorly understood. Functional genomics based on RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) provides the opportunity to derive unbiased comprehensive collections of pharmaceutically tractable single gene targets supporting melanin production. In this study, we have combined a high-throughput, cell-based, one-well/one-gene screening platform with a genome-wide arrayed synthetic library of chemically synthesized, small interfering RNAs to identify novel biological pathways that govern melanin biogenesis in human melanocytes. Ninety-two novel genes that support pigment production were identified with a low false discovery rate. Secondary validation and preliminary mechanistic studies identified a large panel of targets that converge on tyrosinase expression and stability. Small molecule inhibition of a family of gene products in this class was sufficient to impair chronic tyrosinase expression in pigmented melanoma cells and UV-induced tyrosinase expression in primary melanocytes. Isolation of molecular machinery known to support autophagosome biosynthesis from this screen, together with in vitro and in vivo validation, exposed a close functional relationship between melanogenesis and autophagy. In summary, these studies illustrate the power of RNAi-based functional genomics to identify novel genes, pathways, and pharmacologic agents that impact a biological phenotype and operate outside of preconceived mechanistic relationships.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00056-A
Screen Title: Melanogenesis
Assay: Melanin protein expression and viability
Method: Absorbance and luminescence
Scope: Genome-wide
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: MNT-1
Library: Dharmacon, rp
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Normalized absorbance ratio
Cutoff: > 2 standard deviations below mean
Notes: Additional information about a secondary screen (retest to determine false-positive rate)

Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (3)
BCR
-0.74
none yes

Reference

CK1epsilon is required for breast cancers dependent on beta-catenin activity. Kim et al., 2010

Aberrant beta-catenin signaling plays a key role in several cancer types, notably colon, liver and breast cancer. However approaches to modulate beta-catenin activity for therapeutic purposes have proven elusive to date.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00221-A-3
Screen Title: Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (3)
Assay: Viability
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: MDA-MB-453
Library: The RNAi Consortium (TRC), TRC shRNA Library
Reagent Type: shRNA
Score Type: B-score
Cutoff: < -1
Notes: Essential gene: gene with B-score < -1 for >= 2 shRNAs

Homologous recombination DNA double-strand break repair (HR-DSBR) (1)
ENSG00000186716
BCR
np
-0.81
none no

Reference

A genome-scale DNA repair RNAi screen identifies SPG48 as a novel gene associated with hereditary spastic paraplegia. Słabicki et al., 2010

DNA repair is essential to maintain genome integrity, and genes with roles in DNA repair are frequently mutated in a variety of human diseases. Repair via homologous recombination typically restores the original DNA sequence without introducing mutations, and a number of genes that are required for homologous recombination DNA double-strand break repair (HR-DSBR) have been identified. However, a systematic analysis of this important DNA repair pathway in mammalian cells has not been reported. Here, we describe a genome-scale endoribonuclease-prepared short interfering RNA (esiRNA) screen for genes involved in DNA double strand break repair. We report 61 genes that influenced the frequency of HR-DSBR and characterize in detail one of the genes that decreased the frequency of HR-DSBR. We show that the gene KIAA0415 encodes a putative helicase that interacts with SPG11 and SPG15, two proteins mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). We identify mutations in HSP patients, discovering KIAA0415/SPG48 as a novel HSP-associated gene, and show that a KIAA0415/SPG48 mutant cell line is more sensitive to DNA damaging drugs. We present the first genome-scale survey of HR-DSBR in mammalian cells providing a dataset that should accelerate the discovery of novel genes with roles in DNA repair and associated medical conditions. The discovery that proteins forming a novel protein complex are required for efficient HR-DSBR and are mutated in patients suffering from HSP suggests a link between HSP and DNA repair.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00151-A-1
Screen Title: Homologous recombination DNA double-strand break repair (HR-DSBR) (1)
Assay: (HR-DSBR) DR-GFP reporter
Method: Flow cytometry
Scope: Genome-wide
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: HeLa
Library: Custom-made, Custom-made
Reagent Type: esiRNA
Score Type: Z-score
Cutoff: < -2 OR > 2
Notes:

Therapeutic kinase targets in neuroblastoma (1)
613
BCR
BCR
0.68
none yes

Reference

RNAi screen of the protein kinome identifies checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) as a therapeutic target in neuroblastoma. Cole et al., 2011

Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer that is often fatal despite intense multimodality therapy. In an effort to identify therapeutic targets for this disease, we performed a comprehensive loss-of-function screen of the protein kinome. Thirty kinases showed significant cellular cytotoxicity when depleted, with loss of the cell cycle checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1/CHEK1) being the most potent. CHK1 mRNA expression was higher in MYC-Neuroblastoma-related (MYCN)-amplified (P < 0.0001) and high-risk (P = 0.03) tumors. Western blotting revealed that CHK1 was constitutively phosphorylated at the ataxia telangiectasia response kinase target site Ser345 and the autophosphorylation site Ser296 in neuroblastoma cell lines. This pattern was also seen in six of eight high-risk primary tumors but not in control nonneuroblastoma cell lines or in seven of eight low-risk primary tumors. Neuroblastoma cells were sensitive to the two CHK1 inhibitors SB21807 and TCS2312, with median IC(50) values of 564 nM and 548 nM, respectively. In contrast, the control lines had high micromolar IC(50) values, indicating a strong correlation between CHK1 phosphorylation and CHK1 inhibitor sensitivity (P = 0.0004). Furthermore, cell cycle analysis revealed that CHK1 inhibition in neuroblastoma cells caused apoptosis during S-phase, consistent with its role in replication fork progression. CHK1 inhibitor sensitivity correlated with total MYC(N) protein levels, and inducing MYCN in retinal pigmented epithelial cells resulted in CHK1 phosphorylation, which caused growth inhibition when inhibited. These data show the power of a functional RNAi screen to identify tractable therapeutical targets in neuroblastoma and support CHK1 inhibition strategies in this disease.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00193-A-1
Screen Title: Therapeutic kinase targets in neuroblastoma (1)
Assay: Substrate adherent cell growth
Method: rp
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: EBC1
Library: Thermo Scientific, Kinase siGenome library
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Relative growth
Cutoff: 0.5 standard deviations below mean
Notes:

Cell viability
BCR
v2HS_65863
-1.03
Increased cell death HMECs cells no

Reference

Cancer proliferation gene discovery through functional genomics. Schlabach et al., 2008

Retroviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated genetic screens in mammalian cells are powerful tools for discovering loss-of-function phenotypes. We describe a highly parallel multiplex methodology for screening large pools of shRNAs using half-hairpin barcodes for microarray deconvolution. We carried out dropout screens for shRNAs that affect cell proliferation and viability in cancer cells and normal cells. We identified many shRNAs to be antiproliferative that target core cellular processes, such as the cell cycle and protein translation, in all cells examined. Moreover, we identified genes that are selectively required for proliferation and survival in different cell lines. Our platform enables rapid and cost-effective genome-wide screens to identify cancer proliferation and survival genes for target discovery. Such efforts are complementary to the Cancer Genome Atlas and provide an alternative functional view of cancer cells.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00103-A-0
Screen Title: Cell viability
Assay: Cell viability
Method: Micoarray hybridization
Scope:
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: DLD-1, HCT116 (colon cancer); HCC1954 (breast cancer); HMECs (mammary epithelia cells)
Library: , shRNA-mir (G. Hannon)
Reagent Type: shRNA
Score Type: log ratio
Cutoff: <= -1 (>= 50% cell death)
Notes:

Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (2)
BCR
1.43
none yes

Reference

CK1epsilon is required for breast cancers dependent on beta-catenin activity. Kim et al., 2010

Aberrant beta-catenin signaling plays a key role in several cancer types, notably colon, liver and breast cancer. However approaches to modulate beta-catenin activity for therapeutic purposes have proven elusive to date.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00221-A-2
Screen Title: Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (2)
Assay: Viability
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: MDA-MB-231
Library: The RNAi Consortium (TRC), TRC shRNA Library
Reagent Type: shRNA
Score Type: B-score
Cutoff: < -1
Notes: Essential gene: gene with B-score < -1 for >= 2 shRNAs

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (1)
NM_004327
BCR
np
sp
Decreased Hepatitis C Virus pseudoparticles (HCVpp; H77; genotype 1a) infection yes

Reference

EGFR and EphA2 are host factors for hepatitis C virus entry and possible targets for antiviral therapy. Lupberger et al., 2011

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease, but therapeutic options are limited and there are no prevention strategies. Viral entry is the first step of infection and requires the cooperative interaction of several host cell factors. Using a functional RNAi kinase screen, we identified epidermal growth factor receptor and ephrin receptor A2 as host cofactors for HCV entry. Blocking receptor kinase activity by approved inhibitors broadly impaired infection by all major HCV genotypes and viral escape variants in cell culture and in a human liver chimeric mouse model in vivo. The identified receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) mediate HCV entry by regulating CD81-claudin-1 co-receptor associations and viral glycoprotein-dependent membrane fusion. These results identify RTKs as previously unknown HCV entry cofactors and show that tyrosine kinase inhibitors have substantial antiviral activity. Inhibition of RTK function may constitute a new approach for prevention and treatment of HCV infection.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00234-A-1
Screen Title: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (1)
Assay: Hepatitis C Virus pseudoparticles (HCVpp; H77; genotype 1a) protein expression
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: Huh7
Library: Qiagen, Human Kinase RNAi Set V2.0
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Complex, sp
Cutoff: Complex criteria
Notes:

T cell chemotaxis
NM_004327
BCR
np
np
none no

Reference

Synaptotagmin-mediated vesicle fusion regulates cell migration. Colvin et al., 2010

Chemokines and other chemoattractants direct leukocyte migration and are essential for the development and delivery of immune and inflammatory responses. To probe the molecular mechanisms that underlie chemoattractant-guided migration, we did an RNA-mediated interference screen that identified several members of the synaptotagmin family of calcium-sensing vesicle-fusion proteins as mediators of cell migration: SYT7 and SYTL5 were positive regulators of chemotaxis, whereas SYT2 was a negative regulator of chemotaxis. SYT7-deficient leukocytes showed less migration in vitro and in a gout model in vivo. Chemoattractant-induced calcium-dependent lysosomal fusion was impaired in SYT7-deficient neutrophils. In a chemokine gradient, SYT7-deficient lymphocytes accumulated lysosomes in their uropods and had impaired uropod release. Our data identify a molecular pathway required for chemotaxis that links chemoattractant-induced calcium flux to exocytosis and uropod release.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00141-A
Screen Title: T cell chemotaxis
Assay: Cell migration
Method: Fluorescence
Scope: Kinases, phosphatases and selected genes
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: SupT1
Library: TRC, shRNA Library
Reagent Type: shRNA
Score Type: Chemotactic index
Cutoff: > 1 standard deviation from plate mean by at least 2 shRNAs
Notes:

TRAIL-induced apoptosis (1)
NM_207474
FLJ42953
-0.22
none yes

Reference

A synthetic lethal screen identifies FAT1 as an antagonist of caspase-8 in extrinsic apoptosis. Kranz and Boutros, 2014

The extrinsic apoptosis pathway is initiated by binding of death ligands to death receptors resulting in the formation of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC). Activation of procaspase-8 within the DISC and its release from the signaling complex is required for processing executor caspases and commiting cell death. Here, we report that the atypical cadherin FAT1 interacts with caspase-8 preventing the association of caspase-8 with the DISC. We identified FAT1 in a genome-wide siRNA screen for synthetic lethal interactions with death receptor-mediated apoptosis. Knockdown of FAT1 sensitized established and patient-derived glioblastoma cell lines for apoptosis transduced by cell death ligands. Depletion of FAT1 resulted in enhanced procaspase-8 recruitment to the DISC and increased formation of caspase-8 containing secondary signaling complexes. In addition, FAT1 knockout cell lines generated by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering were more susceptible for death receptor-mediated apoptosis. Our findings provide evidence for a mechanism to control caspase-8-dependent cell death by the atypical cadherin FAT1. These results contribute towards the understanding of effector caspase regulation in physiological conditions.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00240-S-1
Screen Title: TRAIL-induced apoptosis (1)
Assay: Viability
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Genome-wide
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: U251MG
Library: Dharmacon, SMART-pool siRNA
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Z-score
Cutoff: > 4
Notes: Author-submitted data

Human papillomavirus oncogene expression regulation (1)
613
BCR
0.03
none no

Reference

Genome-wide siRNA screen identifies SMCX, EP400, and Brd4 as E2-dependent regulators of human papillomavirus oncogene expression. Smith et al., 2010

An essential step in the pathogenesis of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers is the dysregulated expression of the viral oncogenes. The papillomavirus E2 protein can silence the long control region (LCR) promoter that controls viral E6 and E7 oncogene expression. The mechanisms by which E2 represses oncogene expression and the cellular factors through which E2 mediates this silencing are largely unknown. We conducted an unbiased, genome-wide siRNA screen and series of secondary screens that identified 96 cellular genes that contribute to the repression of the HPV LCR. In addition to confirming a role for the E2-binding bromodomain protein Brd4 in E2-mediated silencing, we identified a number of genes that have not previously been implicated in E2 repression, including the demethylase JARID1C/SMCX as well as EP400, a component of the NuA4/TIP60 histone acetyltransferase complex. Each of these genes contributes independently and additively to E2-mediated silencing, indicating that E2 functions through several distinct cellular complexes to repress E6 and E7 expression.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00197-A-1
Screen Title: Human papillomavirus oncogene expression regulation (1)
Assay: HPV18 LCR reporter activity
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Genome-wide
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: C33A/BE2/18LCR c4
Library: Dharmacon, Human siGENOME SMARTpool library
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Z-score
Cutoff: >= 2
Notes: Author-submitted data. Phenotype strength according to Z-scores: weak: 2 - 3; moderate: 3 - 5; strong: > 5

Therapeutic kinase targets in neuroblastoma (4)
613
BCR
BCR
0.66
none no

Reference

RNAi screen of the protein kinome identifies checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) as a therapeutic target in neuroblastoma. Cole et al., 2011

Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer that is often fatal despite intense multimodality therapy. In an effort to identify therapeutic targets for this disease, we performed a comprehensive loss-of-function screen of the protein kinome. Thirty kinases showed significant cellular cytotoxicity when depleted, with loss of the cell cycle checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1/CHEK1) being the most potent. CHK1 mRNA expression was higher in MYC-Neuroblastoma-related (MYCN)-amplified (P < 0.0001) and high-risk (P = 0.03) tumors. Western blotting revealed that CHK1 was constitutively phosphorylated at the ataxia telangiectasia response kinase target site Ser345 and the autophosphorylation site Ser296 in neuroblastoma cell lines. This pattern was also seen in six of eight high-risk primary tumors but not in control nonneuroblastoma cell lines or in seven of eight low-risk primary tumors. Neuroblastoma cells were sensitive to the two CHK1 inhibitors SB21807 and TCS2312, with median IC(50) values of 564 nM and 548 nM, respectively. In contrast, the control lines had high micromolar IC(50) values, indicating a strong correlation between CHK1 phosphorylation and CHK1 inhibitor sensitivity (P = 0.0004). Furthermore, cell cycle analysis revealed that CHK1 inhibition in neuroblastoma cells caused apoptosis during S-phase, consistent with its role in replication fork progression. CHK1 inhibitor sensitivity correlated with total MYC(N) protein levels, and inducing MYCN in retinal pigmented epithelial cells resulted in CHK1 phosphorylation, which caused growth inhibition when inhibited. These data show the power of a functional RNAi screen to identify tractable therapeutical targets in neuroblastoma and support CHK1 inhibition strategies in this disease.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00193-A-4
Screen Title: Therapeutic kinase targets in neuroblastoma (4)
Assay: Substrate adherent cell growth
Method: rp
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: NLF
Library: Thermo Scientific, Kinase siGenome library
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Relative growth
Cutoff: 0.5 standard deviations below mean
Notes:

tau phosphorylation
BCR
BCR s2
sp
none no

Reference

High-content siRNA screening of the kinome identifies kinases involved in Alzheimer's disease-related tau hyperphosphorylation. Azorsa et al., 2010

Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT), a cardinal neuropathological feature of Alzheimer''s disease (AD) that is highly correlated with synaptic loss and dementia severity, appear to be partly attributable to increased phosphorylation of the microtubule stabilizing protein tau at certain AD-related residues. Identifying the kinases involved in the pathologic phosphorylation of tau may provide targets at which to aim new AD-modifying treatments.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00143-A
Screen Title: tau phosphorylation
Assay: Total tau and 12E8 tau protein expression
Method: Fluorescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: H4 overexpressing 4RON tau
Library: Qiagen, Validated human kinase siRNA Set 2.0
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: p-value
Cutoff: Complex criteria
Notes:

Ciliogenesis and cilium length (1)
613
BCR
1332
-35.59
none no

Reference

Functional genomic screen for modulators of ciliogenesis and cilium length. Kim et al., 2010

Primary cilia are evolutionarily conserved cellular organelles that organize diverse signalling pathways. Defects in the formation or function of primary cilia are associated with a spectrum of human diseases and developmental abnormalities. Genetic screens in model organisms have discovered core machineries of cilium assembly and maintenance. However, regulatory molecules that coordinate the biogenesis of primary cilia with other cellular processes, including cytoskeletal organization, vesicle trafficking and cell-cell adhesion, remain to be identified. Here we report the results of a functional genomic screen using RNA interference (RNAi) to identify human genes involved in ciliogenesis control. The screen identified 36 positive and 13 negative ciliogenesis modulators, which include molecules involved in actin dynamics and vesicle trafficking. Further investigation demonstrated that blocking actin assembly facilitates ciliogenesis by stabilizing the pericentrosomal preciliary compartment (PPC), a previously uncharacterized compact vesiculotubular structure storing transmembrane proteins destined for cilia during the early phase of ciliogenesis. The PPC was labelled by recycling endosome markers. Moreover, knockdown of modulators that are involved in the endocytic recycling pathway affected the formation of the PPC as well as ciliogenesis. Our results uncover a critical regulatory step that couples actin dynamics and endocytic recycling with ciliogenesis, and also provides potential target molecules for future study.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00149-A-1
Screen Title: Ciliogenesis and cilium length (1)
Assay: Smoothed protein expression
Method: Fluorescence
Scope: Druggable genes
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: htRPE
Library: Ambion, Human druggable genome siRNA library V3.1
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Normalized percent inhibition
Cutoff: > 1.5 OR < -1.5 standard deviations from mean
Notes:

Combinatorial effect with paclitaxel
NM_004327
BCR
np
1.02
none no

Reference

Synthetic lethal screen identification of chemosensitizer loci in cancer cells. Whitehurst et al., 2007

Abundant evidence suggests that a unifying principle governing the molecular pathology of cancer is the co-dependent aberrant regulation of core machinery driving proliferation and suppressing apoptosis. Anomalous proteins engaged in support of this tumorigenic regulatory environment most probably represent optimal intervention targets in a heterogeneous population of cancer cells. The advent of RNA-mediated interference (RNAi)-based functional genomics provides the opportunity to derive unbiased comprehensive collections of validated gene targets supporting critical biological systems outside the framework of preconceived notions of mechanistic relationships. We have combined a high-throughput cell-based one-well/one-gene screening platform with a genome-wide synthetic library of chemically synthesized small interfering RNAs for systematic interrogation of the molecular underpinnings of cancer cell chemoresponsiveness. NCI-H1155, a human non-small-cell lung cancer line, was employed in a paclitaxel-dependent synthetic lethal screen designed to identify gene targets that specifically reduce cell viability in the presence of otherwise sublethal concentrations of paclitaxel. Using a stringent objective statistical algorithm to reduce false discovery rates below 5%, we isolated a panel of 87 genes that represent major focal points of the autonomous response of cancer cells to the abrogation of microtubule dynamics. Here we show that several of these targets sensitize lung cancer cells to paclitaxel concentrations 1,000-fold lower than otherwise required for a significant response, and we identify mechanistic relationships between cancer-associated aberrant gene expression programmes and the basic cellular machinery required for robust mitotic progression.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00054-A
Screen Title: Combinatorial effect with paclitaxel
Assay: Viability (synthetic lethal)
Method: ATP level
Scope: Genome-wide
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: NCI-H1155
Library: Dharmacon, # G-005000-01
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Paclitaxel/control ratio
Cutoff: Complex criteria
Notes: Additional information about 87 high-confidence hits

TRAIL-induced apoptosis (2)
NM_207474
FLJ42953
-0.42
none no

Reference

A synthetic lethal screen identifies FAT1 as an antagonist of caspase-8 in extrinsic apoptosis. Kranz and Boutros, 2014

The extrinsic apoptosis pathway is initiated by binding of death ligands to death receptors resulting in the formation of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC). Activation of procaspase-8 within the DISC and its release from the signaling complex is required for processing executor caspases and commiting cell death. Here, we report that the atypical cadherin FAT1 interacts with caspase-8 preventing the association of caspase-8 with the DISC. We identified FAT1 in a genome-wide siRNA screen for synthetic lethal interactions with death receptor-mediated apoptosis. Knockdown of FAT1 sensitized established and patient-derived glioblastoma cell lines for apoptosis transduced by cell death ligands. Depletion of FAT1 resulted in enhanced procaspase-8 recruitment to the DISC and increased formation of caspase-8 containing secondary signaling complexes. In addition, FAT1 knockout cell lines generated by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering were more susceptible for death receptor-mediated apoptosis. Our findings provide evidence for a mechanism to control caspase-8-dependent cell death by the atypical cadherin FAT1. These results contribute towards the understanding of effector caspase regulation in physiological conditions.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00240-S-2
Screen Title: TRAIL-induced apoptosis (2)
Assay: Viability (synthetic lethal)
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Genome-wide
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: U251MG
Library: Dharmacon, SMART-pool siRNA
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Differential score
Cutoff: > 3.6 AND viability Z-score < 4
Notes: Author-submitted data. Z-scores from viability screen (1) are considered in score interpretation for this screen. Additional comments are available via the download function

Epithelial cell migration (2)
613
BCR
np
np
Decreased viability yes

Reference

Identification of genes that regulate epithelial cell migration using an siRNA screening approach. Simpson et al., 2008

To provide a systematic analysis of genes that regulate epithelial cell migration, we performed a high throughput wound healing screen with MCF-10A breast epithelial cells, using siRNAs targeting 1,081 human genes encoding phosphatases, kinases and proteins predicted to influence cell migration and adhesion. The primary screen identified three categories of hits: those that accelerate, those that inhibit and those that impair migration with associated effects on cell proliferation or metabolism. Extensive validation of all the hits yielded 66 high confidence genes that, when downregulated, either accelerated or impaired migration; 42 of these high confidence genes have not been previously associated with motility or adhesion. Time-lapse video microscopy revealed a broad spectrum of phenotypic changes involving alterations in the extent and nature of disruption of cell-cell adhesion, directionality of motility, cell polarity and shape, and protrusion dynamics. Informatics analysis highlighted three major signalling nodes, beta-catenin, beta1-integrin and actin, and a large proportion of the genes that accelerated migration impaired cell-cell adhesion.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00055-A-2
Screen Title: Epithelial cell migration (2)
Assay: Cell migration and viability
Method: Microscopy and fluorescence
Scope: Selected genes
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: MCF-10A overexpressing BCL2
Library: Dharmacon AND custom-made, SMARTpool siRNA library
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Area score and Alamar score
Cutoff: Complex criteria
Notes:

Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (4)
BCR
0.72
none no

Reference

CK1epsilon is required for breast cancers dependent on beta-catenin activity. Kim et al., 2010

Aberrant beta-catenin signaling plays a key role in several cancer types, notably colon, liver and breast cancer. However approaches to modulate beta-catenin activity for therapeutic purposes have proven elusive to date.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00221-A-4
Screen Title: Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (4)
Assay: Viability
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: T47D
Library: The RNAi Consortium (TRC), TRC shRNA Library
Reagent Type: shRNA
Score Type: B-score
Cutoff: < -1
Notes: Essential gene: gene with B-score < -1 for >= 2 shRNAs

Homologous recombination DNA double-strand break repair (HR-DSBR) (1)
613
BCR
1.36
none no

Reference

A genome-wide homologous recombination screen identifies the RNA-binding protein RBMX as a component of the DNA-damage response. Adamson et al., 2012

Repair of DNA double-strand breaks is critical to genomic stability and the prevention of developmental disorders and cancer. A central pathway for this repair is homologous recombination (HR). Most knowledge of HR is derived from work in prokaryotic and eukaryotic model organisms. We carried out a genome-wide siRNA-based screen in human cells. Among positive regulators of HR we identified networks of DNA-damage-response and pre-mRNA-processing proteins, and among negative regulators we identified a phosphatase network. Three candidate proteins localized to DNA lesions, including RBMX, a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein that has a role in alternative splicing. RBMX accumulated at DNA lesions through multiple domains in a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1-dependent manner and promoted HR by facilitating proper BRCA2 expression. Our screen also revealed that off-target depletion of RAD51 is a common source of RNAi false positives, raising a cautionary note for siRNA screens and RNAi-based studies of HR.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00236-A-1
Screen Title: Homologous recombination DNA double-strand break repair (HR-DSBR) (1)
Assay: (HR-DSBR) DR-GFP reporter and DNA content
Method: Fluorescence
Scope: Genome-wide
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: DR-U2OS
Library: Dharmacon, Human siGENOME siRNA (G-005000-05)
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Relative HR ratio
Cutoff: < ~0.4 OR > 1.88
Notes: Cutoff values correspond 2 standard deviations from the screen-wide mean

Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (3)
BCR
-0.79
none yes

Reference

CK1epsilon is required for breast cancers dependent on beta-catenin activity. Kim et al., 2010

Aberrant beta-catenin signaling plays a key role in several cancer types, notably colon, liver and breast cancer. However approaches to modulate beta-catenin activity for therapeutic purposes have proven elusive to date.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00221-A-3
Screen Title: Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (3)
Assay: Viability
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: MDA-MB-453
Library: The RNAi Consortium (TRC), TRC shRNA Library
Reagent Type: shRNA
Score Type: B-score
Cutoff: < -1
Notes: Essential gene: gene with B-score < -1 for >= 2 shRNAs

Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (3)
BCR
0.41
none yes

Reference

CK1epsilon is required for breast cancers dependent on beta-catenin activity. Kim et al., 2010

Aberrant beta-catenin signaling plays a key role in several cancer types, notably colon, liver and breast cancer. However approaches to modulate beta-catenin activity for therapeutic purposes have proven elusive to date.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00221-A-3
Screen Title: Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (3)
Assay: Viability
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: MDA-MB-453
Library: The RNAi Consortium (TRC), TRC shRNA Library
Reagent Type: shRNA
Score Type: B-score
Cutoff: < -1
Notes: Essential gene: gene with B-score < -1 for >= 2 shRNAs

Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (2)
BCR
-0.44
none yes

Reference

CK1epsilon is required for breast cancers dependent on beta-catenin activity. Kim et al., 2010

Aberrant beta-catenin signaling plays a key role in several cancer types, notably colon, liver and breast cancer. However approaches to modulate beta-catenin activity for therapeutic purposes have proven elusive to date.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00221-A-2
Screen Title: Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (2)
Assay: Viability
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: MDA-MB-231
Library: The RNAi Consortium (TRC), TRC shRNA Library
Reagent Type: shRNA
Score Type: B-score
Cutoff: < -1
Notes: Essential gene: gene with B-score < -1 for >= 2 shRNAs

Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (3)
BCR
0.85
none yes

Reference

CK1epsilon is required for breast cancers dependent on beta-catenin activity. Kim et al., 2010

Aberrant beta-catenin signaling plays a key role in several cancer types, notably colon, liver and breast cancer. However approaches to modulate beta-catenin activity for therapeutic purposes have proven elusive to date.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00221-A-3
Screen Title: Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (3)
Assay: Viability
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: MDA-MB-453
Library: The RNAi Consortium (TRC), TRC shRNA Library
Reagent Type: shRNA
Score Type: B-score
Cutoff: < -1
Notes: Essential gene: gene with B-score < -1 for >= 2 shRNAs

Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (2)
BCR
-1.02
Decreased viability yes

Reference

CK1epsilon is required for breast cancers dependent on beta-catenin activity. Kim et al., 2010

Aberrant beta-catenin signaling plays a key role in several cancer types, notably colon, liver and breast cancer. However approaches to modulate beta-catenin activity for therapeutic purposes have proven elusive to date.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00221-A-2
Screen Title: Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (2)
Assay: Viability
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: MDA-MB-231
Library: The RNAi Consortium (TRC), TRC shRNA Library
Reagent Type: shRNA
Score Type: B-score
Cutoff: < -1
Notes: Essential gene: gene with B-score < -1 for >= 2 shRNAs

Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (4)
BCR
-0.7
none no

Reference

CK1epsilon is required for breast cancers dependent on beta-catenin activity. Kim et al., 2010

Aberrant beta-catenin signaling plays a key role in several cancer types, notably colon, liver and breast cancer. However approaches to modulate beta-catenin activity for therapeutic purposes have proven elusive to date.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00221-A-4
Screen Title: Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (4)
Assay: Viability
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: T47D
Library: The RNAi Consortium (TRC), TRC shRNA Library
Reagent Type: shRNA
Score Type: B-score
Cutoff: < -1
Notes: Essential gene: gene with B-score < -1 for >= 2 shRNAs

Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (1)
BCR
0.47
none yes

Reference

CK1epsilon is required for breast cancers dependent on beta-catenin activity. Kim et al., 2010

Aberrant beta-catenin signaling plays a key role in several cancer types, notably colon, liver and breast cancer. However approaches to modulate beta-catenin activity for therapeutic purposes have proven elusive to date.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00221-A-1
Screen Title: Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (1)
Assay: Viability
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: MCF7
Library: The RNAi Consortium (TRC), TRC shRNA Library
Reagent Type: shRNA
Score Type: B-score
Cutoff: < -1
Notes: Essential gene: gene with B-score < -1 for >= 2 shRNAs

tau phosphorylation
BCR
BCR s1
sp
none no

Reference

High-content siRNA screening of the kinome identifies kinases involved in Alzheimer's disease-related tau hyperphosphorylation. Azorsa et al., 2010

Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT), a cardinal neuropathological feature of Alzheimer''s disease (AD) that is highly correlated with synaptic loss and dementia severity, appear to be partly attributable to increased phosphorylation of the microtubule stabilizing protein tau at certain AD-related residues. Identifying the kinases involved in the pathologic phosphorylation of tau may provide targets at which to aim new AD-modifying treatments.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00143-A
Screen Title: tau phosphorylation
Assay: Total tau and 12E8 tau protein expression
Method: Fluorescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: H4 overexpressing 4RON tau
Library: Qiagen, Validated human kinase siRNA Set 2.0
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: p-value
Cutoff: Complex criteria
Notes:

Salmonella enterica subspecies 1 serovar Typhimurium invasion (1)
613
BCR
np
-0.25
none no

Reference

RNAi screen of Salmonella invasion shows role of COPI in membrane targeting of cholesterol and Cdc42. Misselwitz et al., 2011

The pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium is a common cause of diarrhea and invades the gut tissue by injecting a cocktail of virulence factors into epithelial cells, triggering actin rearrangements, membrane ruffling and pathogen entry. One of these factors is SopE, a G-nucleotide exchange factor for the host cellular Rho GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42. How SopE mediates cellular invasion is incompletely understood. Using genome-scale RNAi screening we identified 72 known and novel host cell proteins affecting SopE-mediated entry. Follow-up assays assigned these ''hits'' to particular steps of the invasion process; i.e., binding, effector injection, membrane ruffling, membrane closure and maturation of the Salmonella-containing vacuole. Depletion of the COPI complex revealed a unique effect on virulence factor injection and membrane ruffling. Both effects are attributable to mislocalization of cholesterol, sphingolipids, Rac1 and Cdc42 away from the plasma membrane into a large intracellular compartment. Equivalent results were obtained with the vesicular stomatitis virus. Therefore, COPI-facilitated maintenance of lipids may represent a novel, unifying mechanism essential for a wide range of pathogens, offering opportunities for designing new drugs.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00133-A-1
Screen Title: Salmonella enterica subspecies 1 serovar Typhimurium invasion (1)
Assay: Gentamycin protection invasion assay
Method: Fluorescence
Scope: Druggable genes
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: HeLa
Library: Qiagen, Druggable genome library V2.0
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: log2 median
Cutoff: Complex criteria
Notes:

Hepatitis C virus replication (1)
613
BCR
PL-50001
0.53
none no

Reference

A functional genomic screen identifies cellular cofactors of hepatitis C virus replication. Tai et al., 2009

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) chronically infects 3% of the world''s population, and complications from HCV are the leading indication for liver transplantation. Given the need for better anti-HCV therapies, one strategy is to identify and target cellular cofactors of the virus lifecycle. Using a genome-wide siRNA library, we identified 96 human genes that support HCV replication, with a significant number of them being involved in vesicle organization and biogenesis. Phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase PI4KA and multiple subunits of the COPI vesicle coat complex were among the genes identified. Consistent with this, pharmacologic inhibitors of COPI and PI4KA blocked HCV replication. Targeting hepcidin, a peptide critical for iron homeostasis, also affected HCV replication, which may explain the known dysregulation of iron homeostasis in HCV infection. The host cofactors for HCV replication identified in this study should serve as a useful resource in delineating new targets for anti-HCV therapies.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00180-A-1
Screen Title: Hepatitis C virus replication (1)
Assay: HCV replicon RNA copy number
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Genome-wide
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: Huh7/Rep-Feo
Library: Dharmacon, siARRAY Human Genome siRNA Library
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: q-value
Cutoff: Complex criteria
Notes:

Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (4)
BCR
0.41
none no

Reference

CK1epsilon is required for breast cancers dependent on beta-catenin activity. Kim et al., 2010

Aberrant beta-catenin signaling plays a key role in several cancer types, notably colon, liver and breast cancer. However approaches to modulate beta-catenin activity for therapeutic purposes have proven elusive to date.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00221-A-4
Screen Title: Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (4)
Assay: Viability
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: T47D
Library: The RNAi Consortium (TRC), TRC shRNA Library
Reagent Type: shRNA
Score Type: B-score
Cutoff: < -1
Notes: Essential gene: gene with B-score < -1 for >= 2 shRNAs

Cell proliferation
NM_004327
BCR
1.27
none yes

Reference

Time-resolved human kinome RNAi screen identifies a network regulating mitotic-events as early regulators of cell proliferation. Zhang et al., 2011

Analysis of biological processes is frequently performed with the help of phenotypic assays where data is mostly acquired in single end-point analysis. Alternative phenotypic profiling techniques are desired where time-series information is essential to the biological question, for instance to differentiate early and late regulators of cell proliferation in loss-of-function studies. So far there is no study addressing this question despite of high unmet interests, mostly due to the limitation of conventional end-point assaying technologies. We present the first human kinome screen with a real-time cell analysis system (RTCA) to capture dynamic RNAi phenotypes, employing time-resolved monitoring of cell proliferation via electrical impedance. RTCA allowed us to investigate the dynamics of phenotypes of cell proliferation instead of using conventional end-point analysis. By introducing data transformation with first-order derivative, i.e. the cell-index growth rate, we demonstrate this system suitable for high-throughput screenings (HTS). The screen validated previously identified inhibitor genes and, additionally, identified activators of cell proliferation. With the information of time kinetics available, we could establish a network of mitotic-event related genes to be among the first displaying inhibiting effects after RNAi knockdown. The time-resolved screen captured kinetics of cell proliferation caused by RNAi targeting human kinome, serving as a resource for researchers. Our work establishes RTCA technology as a novel robust tool with biological and pharmacological relevance amenable for high-throughput screening.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00231-A
Screen Title: Cell proliferation
Assay: Viability
Method: Electrical impedance
Scope: Kinases and selected genes
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: HeLa
Library: Dharmacon, Human siARRAY - Protein Kinase and Cell Cycle libraries
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Z-score
Cutoff: < -1.96 OR > 1.96
Notes: Additional information about cell titer blue cell viability screen

Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (2)
BCR
0.46
none yes

Reference

CK1epsilon is required for breast cancers dependent on beta-catenin activity. Kim et al., 2010

Aberrant beta-catenin signaling plays a key role in several cancer types, notably colon, liver and breast cancer. However approaches to modulate beta-catenin activity for therapeutic purposes have proven elusive to date.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00221-A-2
Screen Title: Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (2)
Assay: Viability
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: MDA-MB-231
Library: The RNAi Consortium (TRC), TRC shRNA Library
Reagent Type: shRNA
Score Type: B-score
Cutoff: < -1
Notes: Essential gene: gene with B-score < -1 for >= 2 shRNAs

Combinatorial effect with gemcitabine
BCR
BCR_A
-0.76
none no

Reference

Synthetic lethal RNAi screening identifies sensitizing targets for gemcitabine therapy in pancreatic cancer. Azorsa et al., 2009

Pancreatic cancer retains a poor prognosis among the gastrointestinal cancers. It affects 230,000 individuals worldwide, has a very high mortality rate, and remains one of the most challenging malignancies to treat successfully. Treatment with gemcitabine, the most widely used chemotherapeutic against pancreatic cancer, is not curative and resistance may occur. Combinations of gemcitabine with other chemotherapeutic drugs or biological agents have resulted in limited improvement.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00225-A
Screen Title: Combinatorial effect with gemcitabine
Assay: Viability (synthetic lethal)
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: MIA PaCa-2
Library: Qiagen, Validated kinase siRNA library version 1.0
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: log2 ratio
Cutoff: 1.65 SD below mean ratio level
Notes:

Human papillomavirus oncogene expression regulation (1)
400892
FLJ42953
0.39
none no

Reference

Genome-wide siRNA screen identifies SMCX, EP400, and Brd4 as E2-dependent regulators of human papillomavirus oncogene expression. Smith et al., 2010

An essential step in the pathogenesis of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers is the dysregulated expression of the viral oncogenes. The papillomavirus E2 protein can silence the long control region (LCR) promoter that controls viral E6 and E7 oncogene expression. The mechanisms by which E2 represses oncogene expression and the cellular factors through which E2 mediates this silencing are largely unknown. We conducted an unbiased, genome-wide siRNA screen and series of secondary screens that identified 96 cellular genes that contribute to the repression of the HPV LCR. In addition to confirming a role for the E2-binding bromodomain protein Brd4 in E2-mediated silencing, we identified a number of genes that have not previously been implicated in E2 repression, including the demethylase JARID1C/SMCX as well as EP400, a component of the NuA4/TIP60 histone acetyltransferase complex. Each of these genes contributes independently and additively to E2-mediated silencing, indicating that E2 functions through several distinct cellular complexes to repress E6 and E7 expression.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00197-A-1
Screen Title: Human papillomavirus oncogene expression regulation (1)
Assay: HPV18 LCR reporter activity
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Genome-wide
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: C33A/BE2/18LCR c4
Library: Dharmacon, Human siGENOME SMARTpool library
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Z-score
Cutoff: >= 2
Notes: Author-submitted data. Phenotype strength according to Z-scores: weak: 2 - 3; moderate: 3 - 5; strong: > 5

Combinatorial effect with gemcitabine
BCR
BCR_A
0.12
none no

Reference

Synthetic lethal RNAi screening identifies sensitizing targets for gemcitabine therapy in pancreatic cancer. Azorsa et al., 2009

Pancreatic cancer retains a poor prognosis among the gastrointestinal cancers. It affects 230,000 individuals worldwide, has a very high mortality rate, and remains one of the most challenging malignancies to treat successfully. Treatment with gemcitabine, the most widely used chemotherapeutic against pancreatic cancer, is not curative and resistance may occur. Combinations of gemcitabine with other chemotherapeutic drugs or biological agents have resulted in limited improvement.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00225-A
Screen Title: Combinatorial effect with gemcitabine
Assay: Viability (synthetic lethal)
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: MIA PaCa-2
Library: Qiagen, Validated kinase siRNA library version 1.0
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: log2 ratio
Cutoff: 1.65 SD below mean ratio level
Notes:

Epithelial cell migration (1)
613
BCR
np
np
Decreased viability yes

Reference

Identification of genes that regulate epithelial cell migration using an siRNA screening approach. Simpson et al., 2008

To provide a systematic analysis of genes that regulate epithelial cell migration, we performed a high throughput wound healing screen with MCF-10A breast epithelial cells, using siRNAs targeting 1,081 human genes encoding phosphatases, kinases and proteins predicted to influence cell migration and adhesion. The primary screen identified three categories of hits: those that accelerate, those that inhibit and those that impair migration with associated effects on cell proliferation or metabolism. Extensive validation of all the hits yielded 66 high confidence genes that, when downregulated, either accelerated or impaired migration; 42 of these high confidence genes have not been previously associated with motility or adhesion. Time-lapse video microscopy revealed a broad spectrum of phenotypic changes involving alterations in the extent and nature of disruption of cell-cell adhesion, directionality of motility, cell polarity and shape, and protrusion dynamics. Informatics analysis highlighted three major signalling nodes, beta-catenin, beta1-integrin and actin, and a large proportion of the genes that accelerated migration impaired cell-cell adhesion.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00055-A-1
Screen Title: Epithelial cell migration (1)
Assay: Cell migration and viability
Method: Microscopy and fluorescence
Scope: Kinases, phosphatases and migration and adhesion related (MAR) genes
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: MCF-10A
Library: Dharmacon and custom-made, SMARTpool siRNA library and MAR library
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Area score and Alamar score
Cutoff: Complex criteria
Notes:

Ciliogenesis and cilium length (1)
613
BCR
1332
-18.57
none no

Reference

Functional genomic screen for modulators of ciliogenesis and cilium length. Kim et al., 2010

Primary cilia are evolutionarily conserved cellular organelles that organize diverse signalling pathways. Defects in the formation or function of primary cilia are associated with a spectrum of human diseases and developmental abnormalities. Genetic screens in model organisms have discovered core machineries of cilium assembly and maintenance. However, regulatory molecules that coordinate the biogenesis of primary cilia with other cellular processes, including cytoskeletal organization, vesicle trafficking and cell-cell adhesion, remain to be identified. Here we report the results of a functional genomic screen using RNA interference (RNAi) to identify human genes involved in ciliogenesis control. The screen identified 36 positive and 13 negative ciliogenesis modulators, which include molecules involved in actin dynamics and vesicle trafficking. Further investigation demonstrated that blocking actin assembly facilitates ciliogenesis by stabilizing the pericentrosomal preciliary compartment (PPC), a previously uncharacterized compact vesiculotubular structure storing transmembrane proteins destined for cilia during the early phase of ciliogenesis. The PPC was labelled by recycling endosome markers. Moreover, knockdown of modulators that are involved in the endocytic recycling pathway affected the formation of the PPC as well as ciliogenesis. Our results uncover a critical regulatory step that couples actin dynamics and endocytic recycling with ciliogenesis, and also provides potential target molecules for future study.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00149-A-1
Screen Title: Ciliogenesis and cilium length (1)
Assay: Smoothed protein expression
Method: Fluorescence
Scope: Druggable genes
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: htRPE
Library: Ambion, Human druggable genome siRNA library V3.1
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Normalized percent inhibition
Cutoff: > 1.5 OR < -1.5 standard deviations from mean
Notes:

Selective autophagy regulation (1)
NM_004327
BCR
np
sp
none no

Reference

Image-based genome-wide siRNA screen identifies selective autophagy factors. Orvedahl et al., 2011

Selective autophagy involves the recognition and targeting of specific cargo, such as damaged organelles, misfolded proteins, or invading pathogens for lysosomal destruction. Yeast genetic screens have identified proteins required for different forms of selective autophagy, including cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting, pexophagy and mitophagy, and mammalian genetic screens have identified proteins required for autophagy regulation. However, there have been no systematic approaches to identify molecular determinants of selective autophagy in mammalian cells. Here, to identify mammalian genes required for selective autophagy, we performed a high-content, image-based, genome-wide small interfering RNA screen to detect genes required for the colocalization of Sindbis virus capsid protein with autophagolysosomes. We identified 141 candidate genes required for viral autophagy, which were enriched for cellular pathways related to messenger RNA processing, interferon signalling, vesicle trafficking, cytoskeletal motor function and metabolism. Ninety-six of these genes were also required for Parkin-mediated mitophagy, indicating that common molecular determinants may be involved in autophagic targeting of viral nucleocapsids and autophagic targeting of damaged mitochondria. Murine embryonic fibroblasts lacking one of these gene products, the C2-domain containing protein, SMURF1, are deficient in the autophagosomal targeting of Sindbis and herpes simplex viruses and in the clearance of damaged mitochondria. Moreover, SMURF1-deficient mice accumulate damaged mitochondria in the heart, brain and liver. Thus, our study identifies candidate determinants of selective autophagy, and defines SMURF1 as a newly recognized mediator of both viral autophagy and mitophagy.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00242-A-1
Screen Title: Selective autophagy regulation (1)
Assay: Sindbis virus (SIN) capsid SIN-mCherry.capsid and autophagosome GFP–LC3 protein expression
Method: Fluorescence
Scope: Genome-wide
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: HeLa/GFP-LC3
Library: Dharmacon, siGenome
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Z-score
Cutoff: Complex criteria
Notes:

Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (1)
BCR
-0.32
none yes

Reference

CK1epsilon is required for breast cancers dependent on beta-catenin activity. Kim et al., 2010

Aberrant beta-catenin signaling plays a key role in several cancer types, notably colon, liver and breast cancer. However approaches to modulate beta-catenin activity for therapeutic purposes have proven elusive to date.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00221-A-1
Screen Title: Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (1)
Assay: Viability
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: MCF7
Library: The RNAi Consortium (TRC), TRC shRNA Library
Reagent Type: shRNA
Score Type: B-score
Cutoff: < -1
Notes: Essential gene: gene with B-score < -1 for >= 2 shRNAs

Combinatorial effect with gemcitabine
BCR
BCR_B
-0.48
none no

Reference

Synthetic lethal RNAi screening identifies sensitizing targets for gemcitabine therapy in pancreatic cancer. Azorsa et al., 2009

Pancreatic cancer retains a poor prognosis among the gastrointestinal cancers. It affects 230,000 individuals worldwide, has a very high mortality rate, and remains one of the most challenging malignancies to treat successfully. Treatment with gemcitabine, the most widely used chemotherapeutic against pancreatic cancer, is not curative and resistance may occur. Combinations of gemcitabine with other chemotherapeutic drugs or biological agents have resulted in limited improvement.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00225-A
Screen Title: Combinatorial effect with gemcitabine
Assay: Viability (synthetic lethal)
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: MIA PaCa-2
Library: Qiagen, Validated kinase siRNA library version 1.0
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: log2 ratio
Cutoff: 1.65 SD below mean ratio level
Notes:

Cell division (1)
ENSG00000159710
BCR
ENSG00000159710
sp
none no

Reference

Genome-scale RNAi profiling of cell division in human tissue culture cells. Kittler et al., 2007

Cell division is fundamental for all organisms. Here we report a genome-scale RNA-mediated interference screen in HeLa cells designed to identify human genes that are important for cell division. We have used a library of endoribonuclease-prepared short interfering RNAs for gene silencing and have used DNA content analysis to identify genes that induced cell cycle arrest or altered ploidy on silencing. Validation and secondary assays were performed to generate a nine-parameter loss-of-function phenoprint for each of the genes. These phenotypic signatures allowed the assignment of genes to specific functional classes by combining hierarchical clustering, cross-species analysis and proteomic data mining. We highlight the richness of our dataset by ascribing novel functions to genes in mitosis and cytokinesis. In particular, we identify two evolutionarily conserved transcriptional regulatory networks that govern cytokinesis. Our work provides an experimental framework from which the systematic analysis of novel genes necessary for cell division in human cells can begin.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00098-A-1
Screen Title: Cell division (1)
Assay: Cell number and DNA content
Method: Laser scanning cytometry
Scope: Genome-wide
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: HeLa
Library: Custom-made, rp
Reagent Type: esiRNA
Score Type: Complex, sp
Cutoff: Complex criteria
Notes:

Focal adhesion formation
613
BCR
np
sp
none no

Reference

Multiparametric analysis of focal adhesion formation by RNAi-mediated gene knockdown. Winograd-Katz et al., 2009

Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix is mediated by elaborate networks of multiprotein complexes consisting of adhesion receptors, cytoskeletal components, signaling molecules, and diverse adaptor proteins. To explore how specific molecular pathways function in the assembly of focal adhesions (FAs), we performed a high-throughput, high-resolution, microscopy-based screen. We used small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to target human kinases, phosphatases, and migration- and adhesion-related genes. Multiparametric image analysis of control and of siRNA-treated cells revealed major correlations between distinct morphological FA features. Clustering analysis identified different gene families whose perturbation induced similar effects, some of which uncoupled the interfeature correlations. Based on these findings, we propose a model for the molecular hierarchy of FA formation, and tested its validity by dynamic analysis of FA formation and turnover. This study provides a comprehensive information resource on the molecular regulation of multiple cell adhesion features, and sheds light on signaling mechanisms regulating the formation of integrin adhesions.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00210-A
Screen Title: Focal adhesion formation
Assay: paxillin protein expression
Method: Fluorescence
Scope: Kinases, phosphatases and selected genes
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: HeLa
Library: Thermo Fisher Scientific, SMARTpool siARRAY siRNA Libraries
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Z-score
Cutoff: > 3.5 OR < -3.5
Notes:

Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (4)
BCR
-0.01
none no

Reference

CK1epsilon is required for breast cancers dependent on beta-catenin activity. Kim et al., 2010

Aberrant beta-catenin signaling plays a key role in several cancer types, notably colon, liver and breast cancer. However approaches to modulate beta-catenin activity for therapeutic purposes have proven elusive to date.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00221-A-4
Screen Title: Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (4)
Assay: Viability
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: T47D
Library: The RNAi Consortium (TRC), TRC shRNA Library
Reagent Type: shRNA
Score Type: B-score
Cutoff: < -1
Notes: Essential gene: gene with B-score < -1 for >= 2 shRNAs

Circadian clock regulation
NM_004327
BCR
np
np
Decreased circadian period length yes

Reference

A genome-wide RNAi screen for modifiers of the circadian clock in human cells. Zhang et al., 2009

Two decades of research identified more than a dozen clock genes and defined a biochemical feedback mechanism of circadian oscillator function. To identify additional clock genes and modifiers, we conducted a genome-wide small interfering RNA screen in a human cellular clock model. Knockdown of nearly 1000 genes reduced rhythm amplitude. Potent effects on period length or increased amplitude were less frequent; we found hundreds of these and confirmed them in secondary screens. Characterization of a subset of these genes demonstrated a dosage-dependent effect on oscillator function. Protein interaction network analysis showed that dozens of gene products directly or indirectly associate with known clock components. Pathway analysis revealed these genes are overrepresented for components of insulin and hedgehog signaling, the cell cycle, and the folate metabolism. Coupled with data showing many of these pathways are clock regulated, we conclude the clock is interconnected with many aspects of cellular function.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00213-A
Screen Title: Circadian clock regulation
Assay: Circadian clock Bmal1 reporter
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Genome-wide
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: U2OS
Library: Qiagen, np
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Complex, sp
Cutoff: Complex criteria
Notes: Additional information about a secondary screen

Wnt/beta-catenin pathway regulation
613
BCR
np
0.94
none no

Reference

Bruton's tyrosine kinase revealed as a negative regulator of Wnt-beta-catenin signaling. James et al., 2009

Wnts are secreted ligands that activate several receptor-mediated signal transduction cascades. Homeostatic Wnt signaling through beta-catenin is required in adults, because either elevation or attenuation of beta-catenin function has been linked to diverse diseases. To contribute to the identification of both protein and pharmacological regulators of this pathway, we describe a combinatorial screen that merged data from a high-throughput screen of known bioactive compounds with an independent focused small interfering RNA screen. Each screen independently revealed Bruton''s tyrosine kinase (BTK) as an inhibitor of Wnt-beta-catenin signaling. Loss of BTK function in human colorectal cancer cells, human B cells, zebrafish embryos, and cells derived from X-linked agammaglobulinemia patients with a mutant BTK gene resulted in elevated Wnt-beta-catenin signaling, confirming that BTK acts as a negative regulator of this pathway. From affinity purification-mass spectrometry and biochemical binding studies, we found that BTK directly interacts with a nuclear component of Wnt-beta-catenin signaling, CDC73. Further, we show that BTK increased the abundance of CDC73 in the absence of stimulation and that CDC73 acted as a repressor of beta-catenin-mediated transcription in human colorectal cancer cells and B cells.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00016-A
Screen Title: Wnt/beta-catenin pathway regulation
Assay: Wnt/beta-catenin pathway reporter
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Selected genes
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: RKO
Library: rp, rp
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Z-score
Cutoff: > 2
Notes:

Therapeutic kinase targets in neuroblastoma (2)
613
BCR
BCR
0.7
none yes

Reference

RNAi screen of the protein kinome identifies checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) as a therapeutic target in neuroblastoma. Cole et al., 2011

Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer that is often fatal despite intense multimodality therapy. In an effort to identify therapeutic targets for this disease, we performed a comprehensive loss-of-function screen of the protein kinome. Thirty kinases showed significant cellular cytotoxicity when depleted, with loss of the cell cycle checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1/CHEK1) being the most potent. CHK1 mRNA expression was higher in MYC-Neuroblastoma-related (MYCN)-amplified (P < 0.0001) and high-risk (P = 0.03) tumors. Western blotting revealed that CHK1 was constitutively phosphorylated at the ataxia telangiectasia response kinase target site Ser345 and the autophosphorylation site Ser296 in neuroblastoma cell lines. This pattern was also seen in six of eight high-risk primary tumors but not in control nonneuroblastoma cell lines or in seven of eight low-risk primary tumors. Neuroblastoma cells were sensitive to the two CHK1 inhibitors SB21807 and TCS2312, with median IC(50) values of 564 nM and 548 nM, respectively. In contrast, the control lines had high micromolar IC(50) values, indicating a strong correlation between CHK1 phosphorylation and CHK1 inhibitor sensitivity (P = 0.0004). Furthermore, cell cycle analysis revealed that CHK1 inhibition in neuroblastoma cells caused apoptosis during S-phase, consistent with its role in replication fork progression. CHK1 inhibitor sensitivity correlated with total MYC(N) protein levels, and inducing MYCN in retinal pigmented epithelial cells resulted in CHK1 phosphorylation, which caused growth inhibition when inhibited. These data show the power of a functional RNAi screen to identify tractable therapeutical targets in neuroblastoma and support CHK1 inhibition strategies in this disease.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00193-A-2
Screen Title: Therapeutic kinase targets in neuroblastoma (2)
Assay: Substrate adherent cell growth
Method: rp
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: KELLY
Library: Thermo Scientific, Kinase siGenome library
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Relative growth
Cutoff: 0.5 standard deviations below mean
Notes:

Self-renewal and pluripotency in human embryonic stem cells (1)
NM_004327
BCR
-0.93
none no

Reference

A genome-wide RNAi screen reveals determinants of human embryonic stem cell identity. Chia et al., 2010

The derivation of human ES cells (hESCs) from human blastocysts represents one of the milestones in stem cell biology. The full potential of hESCs in research and clinical applications requires a detailed understanding of the genetic network that governs the unique properties of hESCs. Here, we report a genome-wide RNA interference screen to identify genes which regulate self-renewal and pluripotency properties in hESCs. Interestingly, functionally distinct complexes involved in transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodelling are among the factors identified in the screen. To understand the roles of these potential regulators of hESCs, we studied transcription factor PRDM14 to gain new insights into its functional roles in the regulation of pluripotency. We showed that PRDM14 regulates directly the expression of key pluripotency gene POU5F1 through its proximal enhancer. Genome-wide location profiling experiments revealed that PRDM14 colocalized extensively with other key transcription factors such as OCT4, NANOG and SOX2, indicating that PRDM14 is integrated into the core transcriptional regulatory network. More importantly, in a gain-of-function assay, we showed that PRDM14 is able to enhance the efficiency of reprogramming of human fibroblasts in conjunction with OCT4, SOX2 and KLF4. Altogether, our study uncovers a wealth of novel hESC regulators wherein PRDM14 exemplifies a key transcription factor required for the maintenance of hESC identity and the reacquisition of pluripotency in human somatic cells.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00184-A-1
Screen Title: Self-renewal and pluripotency in human embryonic stem cells (1)
Assay: POU5F1 protein expression
Method: Fluorescence
Scope: Genome-wide
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: hESC H1
Library: Dharmacon, SMARTpool siRNA library
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Z-score
Cutoff: < -2
Notes:

Epithelial cell migration (3)
613
BCR
np
np
Decreased cell migration no

Reference

Identification of genes that regulate epithelial cell migration using an siRNA screening approach. Simpson et al., 2008

To provide a systematic analysis of genes that regulate epithelial cell migration, we performed a high throughput wound healing screen with MCF-10A breast epithelial cells, using siRNAs targeting 1,081 human genes encoding phosphatases, kinases and proteins predicted to influence cell migration and adhesion. The primary screen identified three categories of hits: those that accelerate, those that inhibit and those that impair migration with associated effects on cell proliferation or metabolism. Extensive validation of all the hits yielded 66 high confidence genes that, when downregulated, either accelerated or impaired migration; 42 of these high confidence genes have not been previously associated with motility or adhesion. Time-lapse video microscopy revealed a broad spectrum of phenotypic changes involving alterations in the extent and nature of disruption of cell-cell adhesion, directionality of motility, cell polarity and shape, and protrusion dynamics. Informatics analysis highlighted three major signalling nodes, beta-catenin, beta1-integrin and actin, and a large proportion of the genes that accelerated migration impaired cell-cell adhesion.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00055-A-3
Screen Title: Epithelial cell migration (3)
Assay: Cell migration and viability
Method: Microscopy and fluorescence
Scope: Selected genes
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: MCF-10A overexpressing ERBB2
Library: Dharmacon and custom-made, SMARTpool siRNA library and MAR library
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Area score and Alamar score
Cutoff: Complex criteria
Notes:

Therapeutic kinase targets in neuroblastoma (3)
613
BCR
BCR
0.8
Decreased substrate adherent cell growth yes

Reference

RNAi screen of the protein kinome identifies checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) as a therapeutic target in neuroblastoma. Cole et al., 2011

Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer that is often fatal despite intense multimodality therapy. In an effort to identify therapeutic targets for this disease, we performed a comprehensive loss-of-function screen of the protein kinome. Thirty kinases showed significant cellular cytotoxicity when depleted, with loss of the cell cycle checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1/CHEK1) being the most potent. CHK1 mRNA expression was higher in MYC-Neuroblastoma-related (MYCN)-amplified (P < 0.0001) and high-risk (P = 0.03) tumors. Western blotting revealed that CHK1 was constitutively phosphorylated at the ataxia telangiectasia response kinase target site Ser345 and the autophosphorylation site Ser296 in neuroblastoma cell lines. This pattern was also seen in six of eight high-risk primary tumors but not in control nonneuroblastoma cell lines or in seven of eight low-risk primary tumors. Neuroblastoma cells were sensitive to the two CHK1 inhibitors SB21807 and TCS2312, with median IC(50) values of 564 nM and 548 nM, respectively. In contrast, the control lines had high micromolar IC(50) values, indicating a strong correlation between CHK1 phosphorylation and CHK1 inhibitor sensitivity (P = 0.0004). Furthermore, cell cycle analysis revealed that CHK1 inhibition in neuroblastoma cells caused apoptosis during S-phase, consistent with its role in replication fork progression. CHK1 inhibitor sensitivity correlated with total MYC(N) protein levels, and inducing MYCN in retinal pigmented epithelial cells resulted in CHK1 phosphorylation, which caused growth inhibition when inhibited. These data show the power of a functional RNAi screen to identify tractable therapeutical targets in neuroblastoma and support CHK1 inhibition strategies in this disease.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00193-A-3
Screen Title: Therapeutic kinase targets in neuroblastoma (3)
Assay: Substrate adherent cell growth
Method: rp
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: SKNAS
Library: Thermo Scientific, Kinase siGenome library
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Relative growth
Cutoff: 0.5 standard deviations below mean
Notes:

Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (1)
BCR
0.99
none yes

Reference

CK1epsilon is required for breast cancers dependent on beta-catenin activity. Kim et al., 2010

Aberrant beta-catenin signaling plays a key role in several cancer types, notably colon, liver and breast cancer. However approaches to modulate beta-catenin activity for therapeutic purposes have proven elusive to date.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00221-A-1
Screen Title: Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (1)
Assay: Viability
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: MCF7
Library: The RNAi Consortium (TRC), TRC shRNA Library
Reagent Type: shRNA
Score Type: B-score
Cutoff: < -1
Notes: Essential gene: gene with B-score < -1 for >= 2 shRNAs

Cell division (1)
ENSG00000186716
BCR
ENSG00000186716
sp
none no

Reference

Genome-scale RNAi profiling of cell division in human tissue culture cells. Kittler et al., 2007

Cell division is fundamental for all organisms. Here we report a genome-scale RNA-mediated interference screen in HeLa cells designed to identify human genes that are important for cell division. We have used a library of endoribonuclease-prepared short interfering RNAs for gene silencing and have used DNA content analysis to identify genes that induced cell cycle arrest or altered ploidy on silencing. Validation and secondary assays were performed to generate a nine-parameter loss-of-function phenoprint for each of the genes. These phenotypic signatures allowed the assignment of genes to specific functional classes by combining hierarchical clustering, cross-species analysis and proteomic data mining. We highlight the richness of our dataset by ascribing novel functions to genes in mitosis and cytokinesis. In particular, we identify two evolutionarily conserved transcriptional regulatory networks that govern cytokinesis. Our work provides an experimental framework from which the systematic analysis of novel genes necessary for cell division in human cells can begin.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00098-A-1
Screen Title: Cell division (1)
Assay: Cell number and DNA content
Method: Laser scanning cytometry
Scope: Genome-wide
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: HeLa
Library: Custom-made, rp
Reagent Type: esiRNA
Score Type: Complex, sp
Cutoff: Complex criteria
Notes:

Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transduction pathway regulation
613
BCR
BCR_3
BCR_2
BCR_1
np
none no

Reference

RNAi-based screening identifies kinases interfering with dioxin-mediated up-regulation of CYP1A1 activity. Gilot et al., 2011

The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor activated by several environmental pollutants, such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), and involved in carcinogenesis and various physiological processes, including immune response and endocrine functions. Characterization of kinases-related AhR transduction pathway remains an important purpose.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00155-A
Screen Title: Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transduction pathway regulation
Assay: TCDD-induced CYP1A1-related EROD activity and cell viability
Method: Fluorescence and methylene blue
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: MCF-7
Library: Sigma-Genesys, MISSION siRNA Human Kinase Panel library
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Z-score
Cutoff: Top 150 for >= 2 of 3 siRNAs AND no effect on cell proliferation
Notes:

TRAIL-induced apoptosis (1)
NM_004327
BCR
0.7
none yes

Reference

A synthetic lethal screen identifies FAT1 as an antagonist of caspase-8 in extrinsic apoptosis. Kranz and Boutros, 2014

The extrinsic apoptosis pathway is initiated by binding of death ligands to death receptors resulting in the formation of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC). Activation of procaspase-8 within the DISC and its release from the signaling complex is required for processing executor caspases and commiting cell death. Here, we report that the atypical cadherin FAT1 interacts with caspase-8 preventing the association of caspase-8 with the DISC. We identified FAT1 in a genome-wide siRNA screen for synthetic lethal interactions with death receptor-mediated apoptosis. Knockdown of FAT1 sensitized established and patient-derived glioblastoma cell lines for apoptosis transduced by cell death ligands. Depletion of FAT1 resulted in enhanced procaspase-8 recruitment to the DISC and increased formation of caspase-8 containing secondary signaling complexes. In addition, FAT1 knockout cell lines generated by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering were more susceptible for death receptor-mediated apoptosis. Our findings provide evidence for a mechanism to control caspase-8-dependent cell death by the atypical cadherin FAT1. These results contribute towards the understanding of effector caspase regulation in physiological conditions.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00240-S-1
Screen Title: TRAIL-induced apoptosis (1)
Assay: Viability
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Genome-wide
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: U251MG
Library: Dharmacon, SMART-pool siRNA
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Z-score
Cutoff: > 4
Notes: Author-submitted data

Ciliogenesis and cilium length (1)
613
BCR
147329
32.88
none no

Reference

Functional genomic screen for modulators of ciliogenesis and cilium length. Kim et al., 2010

Primary cilia are evolutionarily conserved cellular organelles that organize diverse signalling pathways. Defects in the formation or function of primary cilia are associated with a spectrum of human diseases and developmental abnormalities. Genetic screens in model organisms have discovered core machineries of cilium assembly and maintenance. However, regulatory molecules that coordinate the biogenesis of primary cilia with other cellular processes, including cytoskeletal organization, vesicle trafficking and cell-cell adhesion, remain to be identified. Here we report the results of a functional genomic screen using RNA interference (RNAi) to identify human genes involved in ciliogenesis control. The screen identified 36 positive and 13 negative ciliogenesis modulators, which include molecules involved in actin dynamics and vesicle trafficking. Further investigation demonstrated that blocking actin assembly facilitates ciliogenesis by stabilizing the pericentrosomal preciliary compartment (PPC), a previously uncharacterized compact vesiculotubular structure storing transmembrane proteins destined for cilia during the early phase of ciliogenesis. The PPC was labelled by recycling endosome markers. Moreover, knockdown of modulators that are involved in the endocytic recycling pathway affected the formation of the PPC as well as ciliogenesis. Our results uncover a critical regulatory step that couples actin dynamics and endocytic recycling with ciliogenesis, and also provides potential target molecules for future study.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00149-A-1
Screen Title: Ciliogenesis and cilium length (1)
Assay: Smoothed protein expression
Method: Fluorescence
Scope: Druggable genes
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: htRPE
Library: Ambion, Human druggable genome siRNA library V3.1
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Normalized percent inhibition
Cutoff: > 1.5 OR < -1.5 standard deviations from mean
Notes:

TRAIL-induced apoptosis (2)
NM_004327
BCR
0.96
none no

Reference

A synthetic lethal screen identifies FAT1 as an antagonist of caspase-8 in extrinsic apoptosis. Kranz and Boutros, 2014

The extrinsic apoptosis pathway is initiated by binding of death ligands to death receptors resulting in the formation of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC). Activation of procaspase-8 within the DISC and its release from the signaling complex is required for processing executor caspases and commiting cell death. Here, we report that the atypical cadherin FAT1 interacts with caspase-8 preventing the association of caspase-8 with the DISC. We identified FAT1 in a genome-wide siRNA screen for synthetic lethal interactions with death receptor-mediated apoptosis. Knockdown of FAT1 sensitized established and patient-derived glioblastoma cell lines for apoptosis transduced by cell death ligands. Depletion of FAT1 resulted in enhanced procaspase-8 recruitment to the DISC and increased formation of caspase-8 containing secondary signaling complexes. In addition, FAT1 knockout cell lines generated by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering were more susceptible for death receptor-mediated apoptosis. Our findings provide evidence for a mechanism to control caspase-8-dependent cell death by the atypical cadherin FAT1. These results contribute towards the understanding of effector caspase regulation in physiological conditions.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00240-S-2
Screen Title: TRAIL-induced apoptosis (2)
Assay: Viability (synthetic lethal)
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Genome-wide
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: U251MG
Library: Dharmacon, SMART-pool siRNA
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Differential score
Cutoff: > 3.6 AND viability Z-score < 4
Notes: Author-submitted data. Z-scores from viability screen (1) are considered in score interpretation for this screen. Additional comments are available via the download function

Apoptosis regulation after Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 infection
613
BCR
np
np
none no

Reference

HIF-1α is involved in mediating apoptosis resistance to Chlamydia trachomatis-infected cells. Sharma et al., 2011

Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacteria that cause widespread diseases in humans. Due to the intimate association between bacterium and host, Chlamydia evolved various strategies to protect their host cell against death-inducing stimuli, allowing the bacterium to complete its development cycle. An RNA interference (RNAi)-based screen was used to identify host cell factors required for apoptosis resistance of human epithelial cells infected with Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2. Among the 32 validated hits, the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Mcl-1 was identified as a target. Protein network analyses implicated the transcription factor hypoxia-induced factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) to be central to the regulation of many of the identified targets. Further mechanistic investigations showed that HIF-1α was stabilized within the host cell cytoplasm during early infection time points, followed by its translocation to the nucleus and eventual transcriptional activation of Mcl-1. siRNA-mediated depletion of HIF-1α led to a drastic decrease in Mcl-1, rendering the cell sensitive to apoptosis induction. Taken together, our findings identify HIF-1α as responsible for upregulation of Mcl-1 and the maintenance of apoptosis resistance during Chlamydia infection.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00206-A
Screen Title: Apoptosis regulation after Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 infection
Assay: Cleaved cytokeratin-18 protein expression
Method: Fluorescence
Scope: Apoptosis, cellular trafficking and cell signalling genes
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: HeLa
Library: Custom-made, Custom-made
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: p-value
Cutoff: <= 0.05
Notes: Author-reviewed data

Genome stability
NM_004327
BCR
np
sp
none no

Reference

A genome-wide siRNA screen reveals diverse cellular processes and pathways that mediate genome stability. Paulsen et al., 2009

Signaling pathways that respond to DNA damage are essential for the maintenance of genome stability and are linked to many diseases, including cancer. Here, a genome-wide siRNA screen was employed to identify additional genes involved in genome stabilization by monitoring phosphorylation of the histone variant H2AX, an early mark of DNA damage. We identified hundreds of genes whose downregulation led to elevated levels of H2AX phosphorylation (gammaH2AX) and revealed links to cellular complexes and to genes with unclassified functions. We demonstrate a widespread role for mRNA-processing factors in preventing DNA damage, which in some cases is caused by aberrant RNA-DNA structures. Furthermore, we connect increased gammaH2AX levels to the neurological disorder Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) syndrome, and we find a role for several CMT proteins in the DNA-damage response. These data indicate that preservation of genome stability is mediated by a larger network of biological processes than previously appreciated.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00053-A
Screen Title: Genome stability
Assay: gamma-H2AX phosphorylation and DNA content
Method: Fluorescence
Scope: Genome-wide
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: HeLa
Library: ThermoFisher Scientific, siARRAY human genome siRNA library
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: p-value
Cutoff: Complex criteria
Notes: Confidence groupings from 4 to 1 (highest level of confidence in group 4)

Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (1)
BCR
-0.32
none yes

Reference

CK1epsilon is required for breast cancers dependent on beta-catenin activity. Kim et al., 2010

Aberrant beta-catenin signaling plays a key role in several cancer types, notably colon, liver and breast cancer. However approaches to modulate beta-catenin activity for therapeutic purposes have proven elusive to date.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00221-A-1
Screen Title: Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (1)
Assay: Viability
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: MCF7
Library: The RNAi Consortium (TRC), TRC shRNA Library
Reagent Type: shRNA
Score Type: B-score
Cutoff: < -1
Notes: Essential gene: gene with B-score < -1 for >= 2 shRNAs

Ciliogenesis and cilium length (1)
613
BCR
1237
-6.79
none no

Reference

Functional genomic screen for modulators of ciliogenesis and cilium length. Kim et al., 2010

Primary cilia are evolutionarily conserved cellular organelles that organize diverse signalling pathways. Defects in the formation or function of primary cilia are associated with a spectrum of human diseases and developmental abnormalities. Genetic screens in model organisms have discovered core machineries of cilium assembly and maintenance. However, regulatory molecules that coordinate the biogenesis of primary cilia with other cellular processes, including cytoskeletal organization, vesicle trafficking and cell-cell adhesion, remain to be identified. Here we report the results of a functional genomic screen using RNA interference (RNAi) to identify human genes involved in ciliogenesis control. The screen identified 36 positive and 13 negative ciliogenesis modulators, which include molecules involved in actin dynamics and vesicle trafficking. Further investigation demonstrated that blocking actin assembly facilitates ciliogenesis by stabilizing the pericentrosomal preciliary compartment (PPC), a previously uncharacterized compact vesiculotubular structure storing transmembrane proteins destined for cilia during the early phase of ciliogenesis. The PPC was labelled by recycling endosome markers. Moreover, knockdown of modulators that are involved in the endocytic recycling pathway affected the formation of the PPC as well as ciliogenesis. Our results uncover a critical regulatory step that couples actin dynamics and endocytic recycling with ciliogenesis, and also provides potential target molecules for future study.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00149-A-1
Screen Title: Ciliogenesis and cilium length (1)
Assay: Smoothed protein expression
Method: Fluorescence
Scope: Druggable genes
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: htRPE
Library: Ambion, Human druggable genome siRNA library V3.1
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Normalized percent inhibition
Cutoff: > 1.5 OR < -1.5 standard deviations from mean
Notes:

HIV-1 infection (2)
613
BCR
sp
Decreased Tat-dependent HIV-LTR-beta-galactosidase protein expression no

Reference

Genome-scale RNAi screen for host factors required for HIV replication. Zhou et al., 2008

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 depends on the host cell machinery to support its replication. To discover cellular factors associated with HIV-1 replication, we conducted a genome-scale siRNA screen, revealing more than 311 host factors, including 267 that were not previously linked to HIV. Surprisingly, there was little overlap between these genes and the HIV dependency factors described recently. However, an analysis of the genes identified in both screens revealed overlaps in several of the associated pathways or protein complexes, including the SP1/mediator complex and the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. cDNAs for a subset of the identified genes were used to rescue HIV replication following knockdown of the cellular mRNA providing strong evidence that the following six genes are previously uncharacterized host factors for HIV: AKT1, PRKAA1, CD97, NEIL3, BMP2K, and SERPINB6. This study highlights both the power and shortcomings of large scale loss-of-function screens in discovering host-pathogen interactions.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00224-A-2
Screen Title: HIV-1 infection (2)
Assay: HIV-Tat and HIV-LTR-beta-galactosidase protein expression
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Selected genes
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: HeLa
Library: Dharmacon, Ambion and Proligo, np
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Percentage
Cutoff: < 60 %
Notes: Additional information about the primary genome-wide screen

Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (4)
BCR
-1.37
Decreased viability no

Reference

CK1epsilon is required for breast cancers dependent on beta-catenin activity. Kim et al., 2010

Aberrant beta-catenin signaling plays a key role in several cancer types, notably colon, liver and breast cancer. However approaches to modulate beta-catenin activity for therapeutic purposes have proven elusive to date.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00221-A-4
Screen Title: Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (4)
Assay: Viability
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: T47D
Library: The RNAi Consortium (TRC), TRC shRNA Library
Reagent Type: shRNA
Score Type: B-score
Cutoff: < -1
Notes: Essential gene: gene with B-score < -1 for >= 2 shRNAs

Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (2)
BCR
-0.24
none yes

Reference

CK1epsilon is required for breast cancers dependent on beta-catenin activity. Kim et al., 2010

Aberrant beta-catenin signaling plays a key role in several cancer types, notably colon, liver and breast cancer. However approaches to modulate beta-catenin activity for therapeutic purposes have proven elusive to date.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00221-A-2
Screen Title: Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (2)
Assay: Viability
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: MDA-MB-231
Library: The RNAi Consortium (TRC), TRC shRNA Library
Reagent Type: shRNA
Score Type: B-score
Cutoff: < -1
Notes: Essential gene: gene with B-score < -1 for >= 2 shRNAs

Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (3)
BCR
-0.92
none yes

Reference

CK1epsilon is required for breast cancers dependent on beta-catenin activity. Kim et al., 2010

Aberrant beta-catenin signaling plays a key role in several cancer types, notably colon, liver and breast cancer. However approaches to modulate beta-catenin activity for therapeutic purposes have proven elusive to date.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00221-A-3
Screen Title: Proliferation of cells with active beta-catenin (3)
Assay: Viability
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: MDA-MB-453
Library: The RNAi Consortium (TRC), TRC shRNA Library
Reagent Type: shRNA
Score Type: B-score
Cutoff: < -1
Notes: Essential gene: gene with B-score < -1 for >= 2 shRNAs

Homologous recombination DNA double-strand break repair (HR-DSBR) (1)
400892
FLJ42953
1.13
none no

Reference

A genome-wide homologous recombination screen identifies the RNA-binding protein RBMX as a component of the DNA-damage response. Adamson et al., 2012

Repair of DNA double-strand breaks is critical to genomic stability and the prevention of developmental disorders and cancer. A central pathway for this repair is homologous recombination (HR). Most knowledge of HR is derived from work in prokaryotic and eukaryotic model organisms. We carried out a genome-wide siRNA-based screen in human cells. Among positive regulators of HR we identified networks of DNA-damage-response and pre-mRNA-processing proteins, and among negative regulators we identified a phosphatase network. Three candidate proteins localized to DNA lesions, including RBMX, a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein that has a role in alternative splicing. RBMX accumulated at DNA lesions through multiple domains in a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1-dependent manner and promoted HR by facilitating proper BRCA2 expression. Our screen also revealed that off-target depletion of RAD51 is a common source of RNAi false positives, raising a cautionary note for siRNA screens and RNAi-based studies of HR.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00236-A-1
Screen Title: Homologous recombination DNA double-strand break repair (HR-DSBR) (1)
Assay: (HR-DSBR) DR-GFP reporter and DNA content
Method: Fluorescence
Scope: Genome-wide
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: DR-U2OS
Library: Dharmacon, Human siGENOME siRNA (G-005000-05)
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Relative HR ratio
Cutoff: < ~0.4 OR > 1.88
Notes: Cutoff values correspond 2 standard deviations from the screen-wide mean

Ciliogenesis and cilium length (1)
613
BCR
110844
-80.58
none no

Reference

Functional genomic screen for modulators of ciliogenesis and cilium length. Kim et al., 2010

Primary cilia are evolutionarily conserved cellular organelles that organize diverse signalling pathways. Defects in the formation or function of primary cilia are associated with a spectrum of human diseases and developmental abnormalities. Genetic screens in model organisms have discovered core machineries of cilium assembly and maintenance. However, regulatory molecules that coordinate the biogenesis of primary cilia with other cellular processes, including cytoskeletal organization, vesicle trafficking and cell-cell adhesion, remain to be identified. Here we report the results of a functional genomic screen using RNA interference (RNAi) to identify human genes involved in ciliogenesis control. The screen identified 36 positive and 13 negative ciliogenesis modulators, which include molecules involved in actin dynamics and vesicle trafficking. Further investigation demonstrated that blocking actin assembly facilitates ciliogenesis by stabilizing the pericentrosomal preciliary compartment (PPC), a previously uncharacterized compact vesiculotubular structure storing transmembrane proteins destined for cilia during the early phase of ciliogenesis. The PPC was labelled by recycling endosome markers. Moreover, knockdown of modulators that are involved in the endocytic recycling pathway affected the formation of the PPC as well as ciliogenesis. Our results uncover a critical regulatory step that couples actin dynamics and endocytic recycling with ciliogenesis, and also provides potential target molecules for future study.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00149-A-1
Screen Title: Ciliogenesis and cilium length (1)
Assay: Smoothed protein expression
Method: Fluorescence
Scope: Druggable genes
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: htRPE
Library: Ambion, Human druggable genome siRNA library V3.1
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Normalized percent inhibition
Cutoff: > 1.5 OR < -1.5 standard deviations from mean
Notes:

Ciliogenesis and cilium length (1)
613
BCR
147329
64.93
none no

Reference

Functional genomic screen for modulators of ciliogenesis and cilium length. Kim et al., 2010

Primary cilia are evolutionarily conserved cellular organelles that organize diverse signalling pathways. Defects in the formation or function of primary cilia are associated with a spectrum of human diseases and developmental abnormalities. Genetic screens in model organisms have discovered core machineries of cilium assembly and maintenance. However, regulatory molecules that coordinate the biogenesis of primary cilia with other cellular processes, including cytoskeletal organization, vesicle trafficking and cell-cell adhesion, remain to be identified. Here we report the results of a functional genomic screen using RNA interference (RNAi) to identify human genes involved in ciliogenesis control. The screen identified 36 positive and 13 negative ciliogenesis modulators, which include molecules involved in actin dynamics and vesicle trafficking. Further investigation demonstrated that blocking actin assembly facilitates ciliogenesis by stabilizing the pericentrosomal preciliary compartment (PPC), a previously uncharacterized compact vesiculotubular structure storing transmembrane proteins destined for cilia during the early phase of ciliogenesis. The PPC was labelled by recycling endosome markers. Moreover, knockdown of modulators that are involved in the endocytic recycling pathway affected the formation of the PPC as well as ciliogenesis. Our results uncover a critical regulatory step that couples actin dynamics and endocytic recycling with ciliogenesis, and also provides potential target molecules for future study.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00149-A-1
Screen Title: Ciliogenesis and cilium length (1)
Assay: Smoothed protein expression
Method: Fluorescence
Scope: Druggable genes
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: htRPE
Library: Ambion, Human druggable genome siRNA library V3.1
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Normalized percent inhibition
Cutoff: > 1.5 OR < -1.5 standard deviations from mean
Notes:

HIV-1 infection (1)
613
BCR
sp
Decreased HIV-LTR-beta-galactosidase protein expression yes

Reference

Genome-scale RNAi screen for host factors required for HIV replication. Zhou et al., 2008

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 depends on the host cell machinery to support its replication. To discover cellular factors associated with HIV-1 replication, we conducted a genome-scale siRNA screen, revealing more than 311 host factors, including 267 that were not previously linked to HIV. Surprisingly, there was little overlap between these genes and the HIV dependency factors described recently. However, an analysis of the genes identified in both screens revealed overlaps in several of the associated pathways or protein complexes, including the SP1/mediator complex and the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. cDNAs for a subset of the identified genes were used to rescue HIV replication following knockdown of the cellular mRNA providing strong evidence that the following six genes are previously uncharacterized host factors for HIV: AKT1, PRKAA1, CD97, NEIL3, BMP2K, and SERPINB6. This study highlights both the power and shortcomings of large scale loss-of-function screens in discovering host-pathogen interactions.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00224-A-1
Screen Title: HIV-1 infection (1)
Assay: HIV-LTR-beta-galactosidase protein expression
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Selected genes
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: HeLa
Library: Dharmacon, Ambion and Proligo, np
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Complex, sp
Cutoff: Complex criteria
Notes: Additional information about the primary genome-wide screen

Ciliogenesis and cilium length (1)
613
BCR
110844
-44.35
none no

Reference

Functional genomic screen for modulators of ciliogenesis and cilium length. Kim et al., 2010

Primary cilia are evolutionarily conserved cellular organelles that organize diverse signalling pathways. Defects in the formation or function of primary cilia are associated with a spectrum of human diseases and developmental abnormalities. Genetic screens in model organisms have discovered core machineries of cilium assembly and maintenance. However, regulatory molecules that coordinate the biogenesis of primary cilia with other cellular processes, including cytoskeletal organization, vesicle trafficking and cell-cell adhesion, remain to be identified. Here we report the results of a functional genomic screen using RNA interference (RNAi) to identify human genes involved in ciliogenesis control. The screen identified 36 positive and 13 negative ciliogenesis modulators, which include molecules involved in actin dynamics and vesicle trafficking. Further investigation demonstrated that blocking actin assembly facilitates ciliogenesis by stabilizing the pericentrosomal preciliary compartment (PPC), a previously uncharacterized compact vesiculotubular structure storing transmembrane proteins destined for cilia during the early phase of ciliogenesis. The PPC was labelled by recycling endosome markers. Moreover, knockdown of modulators that are involved in the endocytic recycling pathway affected the formation of the PPC as well as ciliogenesis. Our results uncover a critical regulatory step that couples actin dynamics and endocytic recycling with ciliogenesis, and also provides potential target molecules for future study.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00149-A-1
Screen Title: Ciliogenesis and cilium length (1)
Assay: Smoothed protein expression
Method: Fluorescence
Scope: Druggable genes
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: htRPE
Library: Ambion, Human druggable genome siRNA library V3.1
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: Normalized percent inhibition
Cutoff: > 1.5 OR < -1.5 standard deviations from mean
Notes:

Combinatorial effect with gemcitabine
BCR
BCR_B
-0.31
none no

Reference

Synthetic lethal RNAi screening identifies sensitizing targets for gemcitabine therapy in pancreatic cancer. Azorsa et al., 2009

Pancreatic cancer retains a poor prognosis among the gastrointestinal cancers. It affects 230,000 individuals worldwide, has a very high mortality rate, and remains one of the most challenging malignancies to treat successfully. Treatment with gemcitabine, the most widely used chemotherapeutic against pancreatic cancer, is not curative and resistance may occur. Combinations of gemcitabine with other chemotherapeutic drugs or biological agents have resulted in limited improvement.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00225-A
Screen Title: Combinatorial effect with gemcitabine
Assay: Viability (synthetic lethal)
Method: Luminescence
Scope: Kinases
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: MIA PaCa-2
Library: Qiagen, Validated kinase siRNA library version 1.0
Reagent Type: siRNA
Score Type: log2 ratio
Cutoff: 1.65 SD below mean ratio level
Notes:

TP53 interactions (1)
ENSG00000186716
np
sp
none no

Reference

A systematic RNAi synthetic interaction screen reveals a link between p53 and snoRNP assembly. Krastev et al., 2011

TP53 (tumour protein 53) is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer and its role during cellular transformation has been studied extensively. However, the homeostatic functions of p53 are less well understood. Here, we explore the molecular dependency network of TP53 through an RNAi-mediated synthetic interaction screen employing two HCT116 isogenic cell lines and a genome-scale endoribonuclease-prepared short interfering RNA library. We identify a variety of TP53 synthetic interactions unmasking the complex connections of p53 to cellular physiology and growth control. Molecular dissection of the TP53 synthetic interaction with UNRIP indicates an enhanced dependency of TP53-negative cells on small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein (snoRNP) assembly. This dependency is mediated by the snoRNP chaperone gene NOLC1 (also known as NOPP140), which we identify as a physiological p53 target gene. This unanticipated function of TP53 in snoRNP assembly highlights the potential of RNAi-mediated synthetic interaction screens to dissect molecular pathways of tumour suppressor genes.

Screen Details

Stable ID: GR00196-A-1
Screen Title: TP53 interactions (1)
Assay: TP53 protein expression and viability
Method: Fluorescence
Scope: Genome-wide
Screen Type: Cell-based
Species: Homo sapiens
Biosource: Cell line
Biomodel: HCT116 ( wildtype and TP53 knockout)
Library: Custom-made, rp
Reagent Type: esiRNA
Score Type: Complex, sp
Cutoff: Complex criteria
Notes:

Reagent information for gene 613 (BCR)

Reagent IDTypeLibrary
D-003875-13 siRNA
siGENOME|Thermo Scientific Dharmacon|1|RefSeq release 5-7|84206 siRNAs in pools of four|siRNA|http://www.dharmacon.com/
D-032163-04 siRNA
siGENOME|Thermo Scientific Dharmacon|1|RefSeq release 5-7|84206 siRNAs in pools of four|siRNA|http://www.dharmacon.com/
M-003875-04 siRNA_Pool
siGENOME|Thermo Scientific Dharmacon|1|RefSeq release 5-7|84206 siRNAs in pools of four|siRNA|http://www.dharmacon.com/
D-032163-03 siRNA
siGENOME|Thermo Scientific Dharmacon|1|RefSeq release 5-7|84206 siRNAs in pools of four|siRNA|http://www.dharmacon.com/
D-032163-02 siRNA
siGENOME|Thermo Scientific Dharmacon|1|RefSeq release 5-7|84206 siRNAs in pools of four|siRNA|http://www.dharmacon.com/
D-032163-01 siRNA
siGENOME|Thermo Scientific Dharmacon|1|RefSeq release 5-7|84206 siRNAs in pools of four|siRNA|http://www.dharmacon.com/
D-003875-03 siRNA
siGENOME|Thermo Scientific Dharmacon|1|RefSeq release 5-7|84206 siRNAs in pools of four|siRNA|http://www.dharmacon.com/
D-003875-06 siRNA
siGENOME|Thermo Scientific Dharmacon|1|RefSeq release 5-7|84206 siRNAs in pools of four|siRNA|http://www.dharmacon.com/
D-003875-02 siRNA
siGENOME|Thermo Scientific Dharmacon|1|RefSeq release 5-7|84206 siRNAs in pools of four|siRNA|http://www.dharmacon.com/
M-032163-00 siRNA_Pool
siGENOME|Thermo Scientific Dharmacon|1|RefSeq release 5-7|84206 siRNAs in pools of four|siRNA|http://www.dharmacon.com/
SI00288141 siRNA
Druggable and whole genome supplement|Qiagen|1, 3|RefSeq|70308 siRNAs in pools of four|siRNA|http://www.qiagen.com/
SI00288134 siRNA
Druggable and whole genome supplement|Qiagen|1, 3|RefSeq|70308 siRNAs in pools of four|siRNA|http://www.qiagen.com/
SP00006300 siRNA_Pool
Druggable and whole genome supplement|Qiagen|1, 3|RefSeq|70308 siRNAs in pools of four|siRNA|http://www.qiagen.com/
SI00062762 siRNA
Druggable and whole genome supplement|Qiagen|1, 3|RefSeq|70308 siRNAs in pools of four|siRNA|http://www.qiagen.com/
SI00062769 siRNA
Druggable and whole genome supplement|Qiagen|1, 3|RefSeq|70308 siRNAs in pools of four|siRNA|http://www.qiagen.com/
TRCN0000000790 shRNA
TRC shRNA Library|The RNAi Consortium (TRC)|1|RefSeq|81054|shRNA|http://www.broadinstitute.org/rnai/public/
TRCN0000000791 shRNA
TRC shRNA Library|The RNAi Consortium (TRC)|1|RefSeq|81054|shRNA|http://www.broadinstitute.org/rnai/public/
TRCN0000000792 shRNA
TRC shRNA Library|The RNAi Consortium (TRC)|1|RefSeq|81054|shRNA|http://www.broadinstitute.org/rnai/public/
TRCN0000000789 shRNA
TRC shRNA Library|The RNAi Consortium (TRC)|1|RefSeq|81054|shRNA|http://www.broadinstitute.org/rnai/public/
TRCN0000000793 shRNA
TRC shRNA Library|The RNAi Consortium (TRC)|1|RefSeq|81054|shRNA|http://www.broadinstitute.org/rnai/public/
TRCN0000147268 shRNA
TRC shRNA Library|The RNAi Consortium (TRC)|1|RefSeq|81054|shRNA|http://www.broadinstitute.org/rnai/public/
TRCN0000146832 shRNA
TRC shRNA Library|The RNAi Consortium (TRC)|1|RefSeq|81054|shRNA|http://www.broadinstitute.org/rnai/public/
s1947 siRNA
Ambion Silencer Select|Ambion|1|RefSeq|64781|siRNA|http://www.invitrogen.com/site/us/en/home/brands/ambion.html?CID=fl-ambion
s1948 siRNA
Ambion Silencer Select|Ambion|1|RefSeq|64781|siRNA|http://www.invitrogen.com/site/us/en/home/brands/ambion.html?CID=fl-ambion
s1949 siRNA
Ambion Silencer Select|Ambion|1|RefSeq|64781|siRNA|http://www.invitrogen.com/site/us/en/home/brands/ambion.html?CID=fl-ambion

Gene information for gene 613 (BCR)

Gene:
Alternate gene names:D22S662, BCR1, PHL, CML, ALL, D22S11
Description:breakpoint cluster region
Chromosome:22
Start:23522401
Stop:23660223
Strand:positive
Locus:22q11.23
Biotype:protein-coding
Status:live
Entrez Gene:
GeneCards:
Ensembl:
Hgnc:
Hprd:
Mim:
Uniprot:
Vega:
RefSeq:

Genome browser for gene 613 (BCR)

Homo sapiens GRCh37
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